A public charter is one in which a tour operator rents the aircraft and advertises and sells seats to members of the public, either directly or through a travel agent. In the case of public charters, the flight must be filed with the U.S. Department of Transportation, and the tour operator must supply a charter prospectus. The tour operator also must assume a legal responsibility to provide the transportation service, and must abide by DOT requirements for the protection of the clients' money. Public charters often operate only seasonally, and are often sold as part of a vacation package deal, although spare seats may be offered at bargain prices.
When you fly private charter for the first time, one of the first things you’ll discover is that your flight revolves entirely around your schedule, not the airline’s schedule.  There is no need to check pre-existing flight schedules to choose a time that is ‘close’ to the time you’d like to travel.  And no more arriving hours ahead of the actual time you’re required for a business meeting. You choose exactly when to fly -- based on what’s best for you – not based on which flights are available.
The most economical option is chartering, which doesn't require any cash upfront (other than a deposit) through companies like Tradewind, Sentient, and Solairus, (which we took home from North Carolina). Of course, there are the old standbys like NetJets and Marquis, who sell fractional ownership (like 1/16th) of a single jet for upwards of $100K. One step down from that, pricewise, is the jet card, where you buy a set amount of hours from a company like Nicholas or Private Jet Services, and can use those hours for different planes. Then there are membership models like WheelsUp, where you pay $17,500 as an initiation fee to fly in their fleet, and then a $8,500 annual dues fee starting the second year. It's like a country club—only you're guaranteed access to a KingAir350i or Citation Excel / XLS instead of a golf course.
I met Joel, years ago, when he first introduced me to Stratos Jet Charters during its start-up phase.  I was always very impressed on their marketing and honesty, as a broker.  Joel is very genuine and caring when it comes to his customers or the operators that he works with.  I know that Stratos Jets will not sacrifice safety for anything.  I know that he likes to treat everyone like they are part of the Stratos Jet family.  The trip planning process, from quote request to trip planning to  invoice, is seamless – they’ve thought of everything and continue to be ahead of the trend in our industry with the way they do things.  They think of everything!  In my opinion, Stratos Jet Charters set the bar for aircraft brokerage and I will always continue to look forward to working with them.
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You will be told how much the hold can take on your chosen aircraft and can upgrade if you feel more space is needed. This will generally be far more than that of a commercial airline. You may also need to upgrade if carrying things like golf clubs and skis. If travelling with a gun, you will need to provide a license and the gun and ammunition must be kept separate. It is then at the captain’s discretion whether it can be on board.
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